porridge.

Porridge (historically also spelled porageporrige, or parritch) is a food commonly eaten as a breakfast cereal dish, made by boiling ground, crushed or chopped starchy plants—typically grain—in water or milk. It is often cooked or served with added flavorings such as sugar, honey, (dried) fruit or syrup to make a sweet cereal, or it can be mixed with spices or vegetables to make a savoury dish. It is usually served hot in a bowl, depending on its consistency. Oat porridge, or oatmeal, is one of the most common types of porridge. Gruel is a thinner version of porridge.

A bowl of oatmeal porridge
CourseBreakfast
Serving temperatureHot
Main ingredientsStarchy plants (e.g. grain), water or milk, flavourings
 Cookbook: Porridge   Media: Porridge

Type of grains

Cooked oatmeal in a bowl

The term “porridge” is often used specifically for oat porridge (oatmeal), which is typically eaten for breakfast with salt, sugar, fruit, milk, cream or butter and sometimes other flavorings. Oat porridge is also sold in ready-made or partly cooked form as an instant breakfast.

Other grains used for porridge include rice, wheat, barley, corn, triticale and buckwheat. Many types of porridge have their own names, such as polenta, grits and kasha.

Origins

Historically, porridge was a staple food in much of the world, including Europe and Africa, and it remains a staple food in many parts of the world. Porridge was first produced during the paleolithic by hunter-gatherers, but would become common place during the neolithic. The dish has traditionally been closely associated with Scotland, possibly because oats can be successfully cultivated on marginal upland soils. In 1775, Dr. Samuel Johnson wrote that oats were “a grain which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people”. Oats were introduced to Scotland in about 600 AD, but traces of barley porridge have been found in pots excavated in the Outer Hebrides which have been dated to 2,500 years ago.

Conventional uses

As well as a breakfast cereal, porridge is used in many cultures as a common snack, and is often eaten by athletes.

Nutrition.

Unenriched porridge (oatmeal), cooked with water

Unenriched porridge (as oatmeal), cooked by boiling or microwave, is 84% water, and contains 12% carbohydrates, including 2% dietary fiber, and 2% each of protein and fat (table). In a 100 gram reference amount, cooked porridge provides 71 Calories and contains 29% of the Daily Value (DV) for manganese and moderate content of phosphorus and zinc (11% DV each), with no other micronutrients in significant content (table).

Health effect.

A 2014 review found that daily intake of at least 3 grams of oat beta-glucan lowers total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by 5-10% in people with normal or elevated blood cholesterol levels. Beta-glucan lowers cholesterol by inhibiting cholesterol production, although cholesterol reduction is greater in people with higher total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol in their blood.[9] In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration issued a final ruling in 2015 stating that food companies can make health claims on food labels for products containing soluble fiber from whole oats (oat bran, oat flour and rolled oats), noting that 3.0 grams of soluble fiber daily from these foods may reduce the risk of heart disease.[10] To qualify for the health claim, the food that contains the oats must provide at least 0.75 grams of soluble fiber per serving.

#scottish #foods #porridge #oats #yum Click To Tweet
Facebook Comments
William Sinclair Manson
williamma50@gmail.com
Welcome friends. My name is William Sinclair Manson. I am 60 years young, I am Scottish but now living in a small village in England. I have been blogging for many Years but recently joined Wordpress and I love it. I have made many new dedicated friends here and hope to meet more around the World.

4 thoughts on “Scottish foods. Porridge.”

Please leave me a comment. It's always nice to hear from you. Dont be scared I don't bite lol, If there is anything on my site broken, please let me know. Ta very much.